Author Topic: The weather  (Read 12647 times)

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Offline A Nonny Moose

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Re: The weather
« Reply #60 on: May 23, 2015, 11:50:48 AM »
Well, here we are in the last week of May (Memorial Day weekend in the U.S.) and the high temperatures here in balmy southwestern Ontario are forecast to be in the low 20's.  Hardly a run up to summer.  It is currently 20 C with a chill factor of 18.  It has been chilly all week.

I can hardly believe we are running along with only about four weeks to go to the solstice and the official beginning of summer.  Overall, this month has been more like the historical April.

And yet, the NOAA is warning about the formation of an exceptionally large, hot El Niņo.  This promises some really bad cyclonic storms in the Pacific ocean and continuation of the southwestern U.S. drought.  The local landscrapers should be promoting desert flora instead of grass for home settings.

And about the Niagara Bench:  That's my home stamping ground, and I grew up in Stamford Township in the 1940s and '50s.  In the bad old days the wines from there were made from the Labrusca grape and were very foxy.  Now, they are using imported vine stock, and are producing wines that compete in the world market.  It's a great place to visit, but I wouldn't want to live there any more.

The blossom tours must be in full swing by now, as I expect things were a little late.  Nothing like a hill covered with cherry blossoms.  Many other fruit trees are just as spectacular.  If anyone gets a chance in the summer, book a week at the Shaw festival in Niagara-on-the-Lake.  A fun place for a tourist trap, and there are three live theatres.  Yachties can find accommodation in the mouth of the Niagara River, but do watch the currents.  Very friendly marina/yacht club there.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2015, 12:05:07 PM by A Nonny Moose »
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Offline assobanana76

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Re: The weather
« Reply #61 on: May 25, 2015, 12:18:36 AM »
I do not know if the trees have any kind of game mechanic that differentiates between their usability as nektar and pollen sources. I can give some real-life pointers though:
The bees should have access to nektar producing flowers as early as possible and stretch as late as possible. This means either a mix of plants in one yard or (more common) moving the cubes to somewhere with flowering plants.
In my garden the trees, herbs and bushes start to flower in roughly this succession: Maples, dandelions, cherries, plums, blackcurrant, pears, apples, redcurrant, lilac, strawberries, raspberries, roses, clovers, peas,georgines. Some keep flowering throughout the season, others have as short a period as a week.
thanks!
then I put within maple, plum, pear, apple, strawberry and raspberries!
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Offline rkelly17

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Re: The weather
« Reply #62 on: May 26, 2015, 09:09:25 AM »
And about the Niagara Bench:  That's my home stamping ground, and I grew up in Stamford Township in the 1940s and '50s.  In the bad old days the wines from there were made from the Labrusca grape and were very foxy.  Now, they are using imported vine stock, and are producing wines that compete in the world market.  It's a great place to visit, but I wouldn't want to live there any more.

The blossom tours must be in full swing by now, as I expect things were a little late.  Nothing like a hill covered with cherry blossoms.  Many other fruit trees are just as spectacular.  If anyone gets a chance in the summer, book a week at the Shaw festival in Niagara-on-the-Lake.  A fun place for a tourist trap, and there are three live theatres.  Yachties can find accommodation in the mouth of the Niagara River, but do watch the currents.  Very friendly marina/yacht club there.

When we were there on Victoria Day weekend the apricots were all done, most of the cherries were done, but most peaches were in full flower. The farm we visited is just north of Virgil. All of his neighbors used to live on the farms and grow stone fruits. Now all the neighboring farms are owned by people who live in Toronto (or further away) and grow wine grapes. Hard to make a living growing fruit; many people who own wineries don't have to make a living from them. The wine is much better than it used to be