Author Topic: scale for drawing in Blender  (Read 388 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Voeille

  • Trader
  • ****
  • Posts: 205
  • Country: 00
Re: scale for drawing in Blender
« Reply #15 on: May 28, 2018, 03:00:59 AM »
For what I understand, you selected one piece on the UV map, moved it, and then you found out that thereís another piece under it? If so, thatís normal. There should be an option to select all of them, but I canít help with that because I donít know Blender enough. If there isnít an option like that, just use UV Mapper to move/resize the stacked parts, itís a tiny free program. In order to do that, you need to export your model as OBJ.

No idea about seams at all, someone experienced with Blender should be able to help with that.

Offline Tom Sawyer

  • Modders
  • Architect
  • *****
  • Posts: 849
  • Country: is
Re: scale for drawing in Blender
« Reply #16 on: May 28, 2018, 03:35:12 AM »
I also find it a bit difficult to see what's going on in your Blender from what you write. Basically the uv map is just a virtual image of your mesh. It is like tailoring a coat in real but backward, cutting it along seams and then lying all pieces on the floor to paint them. That's what unwrapping is since the texture image is of course always a 2D picture and the game needs some info how to put it on your 3D model.

The steps when unwrapping in Blender is cleaning up the model by removing doubled vertices and then marking seams along edges where you want to "unfold" your model and then click unwrap. The faces in your uv map can be scaled and arranged manually as you like. For example to overlap them for efficient use of the texture or so. The second option is to unwrap as "smart uv project". Here you don't need seams and all faces are arranged separately. Both ways have their advantages. I normally use smart project to get all faces with correct proportions. For items with round shapes I use seams to get connected faces.

In any case it's not changing your mesh. Only defining a map with coordinates for every face to add texture. Maybe that helps you a bit. :)

Offline BlueFireChelle

  • Laborer
  • **
  • Posts: 45
  • Country: 00
Re: scale for drawing in Blender
« Reply #17 on: May 28, 2018, 04:30:05 AM »
@Voeille  that's exactly what I did! I didn't realise until this thread that there were multiple versions all stacked up.

@Tom Sawyer Whatever I am doing when I select the seams is not giving me a nice neat unwrap. I've got wonky bits all over the place! Not to worry. I'm nearly finished putting the textures on in photoshop so I'll see what I end up with. I think that will make it easier for next time. I think I'll try the Smart UV that you mention and see if that helps me.

thanks to you both!

Offline Voeille

  • Trader
  • ****
  • Posts: 205
  • Country: 00
Re: scale for drawing in Blender
« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2018, 06:54:41 AM »
Itís not really multiple versions stacked up, itís maps for different parts of the model. Itís good to stack things up and make several parts of the model share the same texture. Letís say you have two planes. If you want them to share the same texture, one thing you can do is stack them up, and the other is put them next to each other on the map and copy the texture. But you never want to do the latter, because two planes would take more space, and youíd need to make them smaller, which you definitely donít want. You want each piece that needs a separate texture as big on the map as possible, and share as much texture as possible. That gives you room for more detail without the need to use large files.

Edit: I made a mistake with not stacking enough on this map for this lamp. Those two parts at the bottom should be stacked, instead of letting them just reflect 2 sides of a cube each. That gives me room to make them a bit different if I wanted, but I donít think I would for that model, so Iím just wasting space. Itís not a big deal for that map as there isnít much going on, but still, it was a bad practice to do it, and definitely not the most efficient map layout for that model. Incidentally, while speaking about that lamp, itís a good example to show how important on-texture shading is. This is how it looked before I did it (and this was the texture). Never ignore on-texture shading, but thatís something done later, after your model is ready.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2018, 07:17:13 AM by Voeille »

Offline BlueFireChelle

  • Laborer
  • **
  • Posts: 45
  • Country: 00
Re: scale for drawing in Blender
« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2018, 04:50:23 PM »
thanks for being so generous with advice @Voeille   The difference in that lamp is huge with the on-texture shading. I've not gotten up to that yet, and don't actually know what it is! But it looks magic compared to the first version. I'm hoping to get back to my model straight after work today... I'm yet to see how my texture map actually turns out on the model. I'm expecting a hilarious result with lots of opportunities to learn  :-\ :D

Offline Voeille

  • Trader
  • ****
  • Posts: 205
  • Country: 00
Re: scale for drawing in Blender
« Reply #20 on: May 29, 2018, 05:34:37 AM »
On texture shading is, well, shading put directly on the texture. AO maps canít replace it, at least for all I can tell after making plants.