Author Topic: Artfactial- Connecticut Coastal Colony- Haynestown and it's genealogy  (Read 9281 times)

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Offline Artfactial

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Re: Artfactial- Connecticut Coastal Colony- Haynestown and it's genealogy
« Reply #60 on: April 23, 2020, 02:09:05 AM »
I've begun to slowly get back into the setting by reading up on specific historical aspects on Connecticut and New England as a whole. Found a, free to download, collection of the Tercentenial anniversary of the state from the 1930's in the federal archives which is proving to be a treasure trove!

For anyone interested in the more personal side of the area and a wonderful look into the daily lives I can recommend the journal of Madam Sarah Knight who traveled from Boston to New York and back in the winter of 1703/1704. She travels close to the exact location of Haynestown and vividly comments on the towns and people she meets. She uses an amusing and sharp writing style and displays the great hardship a traveler had to go through in those times where roads were still little more than semi-cleared paths, this is of course made even more extraordinary as she does large parts of it on her own or with a single guide in a time and place where this was most unusual for a Woman.
A fair warning for viscous racism and belittling, but it does highlight in many ways how liberal and progressive Connecticut was in its handling of laws, slavery and rights. Something I have been trying to show in Haynestown.
I'll include a 1865 copy of the journal with very informative annotations!

I've nearly finished writing up 1695 and 1696, so hope to post those soon. But I'll slow down on further years to read up on the early 1700's.

Offline Nilla

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Re: Artfactial- Connecticut Coastal Colony- Haynestown and it's genealogy
« Reply #61 on: April 23, 2020, 02:33:08 AM »
I'm sure, you are more used to historical research than I am but it looks like we both enjoy reading about historical facts to get a foundation for out Banished games. In your case, you'll find first hand information easier than I do. Anyway, it's an interesting and for me a totally new way to approach a Banished game. I will probably not read the added journal even if the old lady seem pretty "cool" but I'm looking forward to read your journal.

Offline Artfactial

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Re: Artfactial- Connecticut Coastal Colony- Haynestown and it's genealogy
« Reply #62 on: April 23, 2020, 02:53:38 AM »
Oh I agree that for getting a historical overview and diving into minute details, it is often better to read from historians and archaeologists, even though some have a tenancy to be too dry for my tastes. But I like to combine the two a lot; the historians, with the power of hindsight, give the first hand accounts the context and frame of reference to understand the motivations of those writers.:) I won't say that they're much easier to read, but especially journals and ship-logs thrill me with their anecdotes and impressions.
The historians sketch the outlines which are colored by the people who lived it.:)
Gehe, no problem, I leave her journal here since it fits so nicely in the time and location.
Thanks! I'm getting excited to get back into it.:)

Offline Artfactial

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Notes on the Council Meeting of November 15th AD 1695
« Reply #63 on: April 26, 2020, 07:26:54 AM »
Notes on the Council Meeting of November 15th AD 1695

The council opens the meeting by acknowledging the death of 41 persons. Most notable among them being Haywardo Haynes, who passed away last October.
We mourn the passing of our 11th Gorvernor through whom much of the wisdom of the founders was transferred to younger generations.
Time is taken likewise to mourn the passing of Consuelle Germain through whom many early trade relations and  newcomers have been welcomed into our town, a legacy which will live on through these actions.

Late in February, a woman was found dead outside the city gates, a ghost of a figure, more skin than human. The elderly of the town remarked on her striking resemblance to Analiana Grimberghen.
During Lent the festivities were halted abruptly when Jessiah Porter wandered into town, raving and wailing. He spoke fevered of a cabin in the woods where he had been held against his will by the Grimberghen girl seemingly bewitched by an elderly woman who would only speak through Analia; and then relaying the most foul of intents. He named them witches and Devilworshippers. It was only after the death of the crone that Analiana had left the cabin and Jessiah was able to make his escape. Sadly he was too far gone to be saved and he passed away on 4th of April.
Half a dozen of our rangers went out to the area described by mister Porter and, indeed, found a decrepit, deserted, log cabin sometime east of our town. They burned it down and took possession of some 50 pelts held in a locker there.
The news of the Grimberghen Witches, by many believed to be banished Tanjaney and her sister Analiana, has sparked much unrest among the people. We take solace in the fact that this is the tail end of a vile story.

On Construction:
Last November a new fishing shack was finished by the New Pastures, which assumed practice as soon  river had lost its biting frost.
Just in time for spring a new, neat, little school was completed by the Brickworks, of which Herschelen became the headmaster. Fidelli Grimberghen became the first student to assume tutelage.
On the 26th of June a third school was completed at the New Pasture, headed by Lakenzie Green.
Hilip Green, who succeeded Herschelen in summer, died of the hunger in September and has been succeeded as preacher of the Reformed Congregation of Brakel parish by Verly Fox.

On the burgesses:
The council takes note of 16 newborn this year.
Mister Kristophe Glowbrenn and Madam Princenze Chaarason moved into the Haynes Estate house, a deed which she had claim to through her mother, Mistyn Haynes.
In January, Brean Glowbrenn, who had raised a family on her own, her husband being at sea, finally remarried to Austy Dregg, a merchant who recently moved into town. They now live in the south side house of the Three Pines Parish.
After having been married in January of ‘94, Mister Orio Glowbrenn and  Madam Cammi Haynes divorced in May, when Madam Beverli Le Veelu became pregnant with Farren Glowbrenn. This matter of discontinuing the marriage was settled in a discrete Court of Law at the family home, as to not publicize a private matter which is already a sore for both families.
After the death of Michelsy Lee and their three children, Wintonewall Harrison remarried Madam Cammi Haynes in early august. After Wintonewall passed away later that month, Vicker Myrone moved in with the Widow Cammi, a concern that suits them both.
Mister Talonso Mersey remarried Givannalison Applegate, after Deaanabel Barents’ passing in ‘92.
Mister Llewell Ludlow remarried Bennifred Davonport after Hessi Hartfort passed away in September.
Under normal circumstances the council and community would frown upon these quick matrimonial bonds but, given the times and troubles it is generally accepted that husbandry and family support are of great importance.

Sad news from England reached our shores: late December of last year, Her Majesty Queen Mary II fell ill and died of the Small Pox. Her reign with King William had been a breath of fresh air and progression to the Old Isles. William is now the sole monarch and shall rule England in her stead.
In her honor and to symbolize the power of community and cooperation, the Market Square, besides the Town Commons shall from this date be known as Queen Mary’s Square. 

On the starving:
While in the spring the food flowed through town steadily still, the people of the townships of the Brickworks and New Pastures were generally on the brink of starvation and some had taken to stealing of food from storage barns and the fields.
To Magister Kurtiss Mersey and Reverent Darney Mersey have called for a general charity in the community; to aid those in need but punish them who abuse the trust put into them and take from others. Rev. Merseys explained in his sermons how the punishment for our past reveling, debauchery and wickedness has come in the form of this hunger, like the tide that swept the filth of Port Royale into the sea.
To further ward against these vices, the construction of a pillory at Queen Marty’s Square has been decreed at which those that cross the community shall be punished and displayed to all.
As the farmers from the towns tended to their homes or fell to the starving it was decreed at the beginning of September 1695, to be sending home the 51 Latin school students and postpone the teaching there until a time where the children were not needed out in the fields and at home.
As the hunger tore through the town at this time, it first took the possessed infant Demon Glowbrenn in September, followed by the rest of the family, Waylan, Neva and daughter Kavonte in October. Reverent Errold Germain announced it the Grace of God who has forgiven them and now watches over them in heaven.
Following this, in November the council decreed to a decimation of the livestocks for an influx in meats. Exempted to this are the sheep flocks.

On Trade:
The Albemarle from New Haven docked in again, to aid in our troubles and brough us 1712 Lentil sacks and 813 lettuces in September.

Governor Clarench Germain,
Ruling Council Members , Darney Mersey, Dandreas Chaarason, Aryant Glowbrenn, Jalentin Barents & Cleonidad LeFevre
« Last Edit: April 28, 2020, 10:56:36 PM by Artfactial »

Offline Nilla

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Re: Artfactial- Connecticut Coastal Colony- Haynestown and it's genealogy
« Reply #64 on: April 27, 2020, 01:15:37 AM »
Can you keep track of everyone after the starvation?

Did you made the starvation deliberately to get some historical correctness or did you simply pay too much attention to keeping track of your people?

Offline Artfactial

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Re: Artfactial- Connecticut Coastal Colony- Haynestown and it's genealogy
« Reply #65 on: April 27, 2020, 01:42:38 AM »
Keeping track of everyone during starvations or epidemics is a nightmare, for sure.:P
Knowing who is who and where they live helps a lot in predicting who might be looking for a new partner.
When a child is born I scan all (probable) buildings to find it, doing this often helps keeping up to date and forming the story in my head. This way I am able to take note of new families being formed/broken.
There's some pretty wild marriage switching and social-ladder climbing going on but I think I have most of it down.:)
I really am missing some major social plot points in all the chaos. Infamous people staying in powerful positions, the dealings with hundreds of corpses and the general state of mourning and loss the town must be in and the impact this would have on younger people leaving town or turning to crime. I hope to have all that at least touched on, but really need to get on track again.

Starvation was mostly accidental, sadly. While the Connecticut coastal grounds are rocky and not super fertile so growing crops would have been hard (they relied way more on fishing then I have been thus far), I didn't take time to make larger fields and was indeed too focused on keeping the data and town renovations in check.
What's worse: in my recent studies I found out that cranberry, watercress and mushroom cultivation didn't come to America until the early 19th century so I really am going to have to make a giant fishing industry.
I've added the Maritime Shore sets so that should help a bit.
Here's hoping I can get(and keep) it all together.
Tool (and by extension food) management are always a problem for me.;)

But first getting that possible Maritime Pine mod stuff sorted...and writing another 4 years of reports before I can really start playing again. Good to be back there though; I spend half an hour just looking through town when I first booted the game up again.

Offline Artfactial

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Re: Artfactial- Connecticut Coastal Colony- Haynestown and it's genealogy
« Reply #66 on: April 28, 2020, 08:49:10 AM »
Experimenting with scattering decorative trees, native to Connecticut.

Maybe they're born with it. Maybe it's Maple trees.

Offline Artfactial

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Notes on the Council Meeting of November 1696
« Reply #67 on: April 29, 2020, 05:19:05 AM »
Notes on the Council Meeting of November 1696

On the Burgesses and the Starving:
By late October the food shortage was abating and on the 6th of November 1696 a day of Thanks-Giving was proclaimed. All families in attendance were seen to a package of food after the mass. However, due to a shortage in workmen on the burgerwoods many homes were cold and dark as there was not enough firewood to go around. Thusly we were equally thankful for the healthy flocks of sheep that give us crude but warm clothes.   
During the trying times of last year, Noelian van Grimberghen started a small wagon stall (bartered for in Bridgeport) to peddle food from the market to the people of the New Pastures town, the crossroads has since been named Wagon’s Crossing. While such roguish merchandising is generally frowned upon, the intent of seeing to her neighbours needs is virtuous indeed.
During summer the Saint Damasus Church has opened the Saint Agnes Orphanage on the second street where now young Lores, Nellamae, Renna and Rene reside under the care of Madam Moria Le Duff. There the girls will tend to the sheep and be taught in proper virtues.
Rose Parker and Madam Matha Haynes now live in the new house previously owned by Katarin and Waylando. The couple have, besides their newborn Artholomew Parker, also taken in the foundling Analisson in.
Ludwight Vincian and Herlie Mersey have married and taken residence on the Chaarason estate.
Mathia de Graaf and Terressika Mersey now live in the old Germain estate.
Vesteban Gowan moved in with Sophronica van Grimberghen and engaged in Marriage soon after.
After late Hessi Hartfort’s death last year, Llewell Ludlow and Bennifred Davonport married this summer and are now living by brickworks.
Militiamen Hall Towbridge and Elberto Viatti have volunteered as keepers of Fort and as such reside there now, Mr. Hall being granted the rank of Seargent.

On construction and plantation:
In the winter of last year it was decided, through vote, to decommission the old windmill, as the new town mill and the Gowan Mill (run by Madam Dela Germain Gowan) by the canal supply in grinding most of our grains and the timber structure of the old one had started to rot. This process was started in the spring.
In February the new candle workshop opened doors and, under Madam Giovannalison Applegate’s expertise, will supply our homes with more light in the during the dark winters.
The new stone North bridge was half finished, when the yearly swelling of the river blew a large part of it away, it became apparent that its construction was faulty and would not withstand  the whiles of the water. The old wooden bridge will stay in use until a time when the construction contract of a new one can be procured.
In June, the Trinity Church burying yard was expanded into the town Commons, most dead among the Burgesse of last year lie in a mass grave. Monument to be erected.
In September of last year, after Lashade Le Veelu’s death, Audio Le Veelu, never truly disowned of his inheritance, took possession of the Le Veelu estate and its, now non-operational, mines.

In more distressing news, the watercress and cranberry plantations our community has been trying to embark on for the last decade have steadily grown more diseased and each winter more and more of the plants rot and die off. It is this council’s opinion and, by vote, shared by the Baystreet farmers, that the cultivation should be stopped and, in these trying times, more agreeable crops should be endeavored upon. The cress and cranberry farms will steadily be deconstructed and new piers ought to be built in their place to make more use of the eels, crayfish and mudfish in the lake.
With many cress and cranberry farmers looking for new occupations, by August both a new drying racks as well as a bed for attempting to grow mushrooms were completed by the New Pastures.
A new Pumpkin field  was ready at the New Pastures by January and was first sowed in the spring.
In May the pear trees in Mister Jalentin Barent’s yard developed a blight, they had to be cut down before the miasmas could spread.

On the War and England:
King William’s war with the French and Northern Indians continues and the Massachusetts colonies and Newfoundland have seen dreadful times. Especially new of the raids on Newfoundland speak of many dead and most of the settlements destroyed, to which Major Benjamin Church’s Rangers have responded in kind.

Amongst all this bloodshed for the Dominion of England, which supposedly unites us, there has yet to come any aid from His Majesty to these shores. Instead we have received the news that yet another act has been decreed upon our trading ports, being the ‘Act for preventing Frauds and regulating Abuses in the Plantation Trade’.
As of the 25th of March of 1696, this renewed Navigation Act is more intrusive and restrictive to our charter then those that have been issued before. While our town is largely dependent on trade between the colonies, the merchants sailing from New haven, New London, New York and Boston ports have now been order to only import and export on vessels under the English flag, which will hinder our future endeavors to strike coin out of these lands greatly. Seeing as New haven has yet to see the successful return of any of their port made ships, it seems that God intents to seclude us to these shores.
Furthermore all colonies are instructed to ward against the pyrate activities that have become increasingly bold in the past years.

To this end the Council has decreed the building of a fortified tower by the Bay Gate to serve as both prison and Court of the Vice-Admirality. This to deter any would-be looters, pyrates or vagabonds from disturbing the trading routes and civility in these parts. By vote, and with consent of the assembly, the council allocates the recently purchased shipment of split-stone from Middleton, intended for the unfinished city-wall, to be used for this prison tower.

Accounting:
The council takes note of 8 deaths and 14 newborn in this year.
The total population of the combined congregations being a 369 on this date.
Harvest:
Rye-2872
Squash-840
Melons-992
Carrots-953
Pumpkin-720
Strawberry-500

Trade:
In april: a 1000 beetroots and a 1000 pumpkins from New Haven for feathers, a 144 fleeces of wool and 14 assorted furs.
Also, a good quantity of dried herbs and flax was traded for Hops seeds from Hartfort.
In June, we chartered a merchant from Middletown to purchase stone from for the fortifications. Traded 69 blocks.
September, 35 copper alloy tools, crafted in Nurenberg, bartered for bonemeal, glass and linnens.

Governor Clarench Germain,
Ruling Council Members , Darney Mersey, Dandreas Chaarason, Aryant Glowbrenn, Jalentin Barents & Cleonidad LeFevre

« Last Edit: September 03, 2020, 04:48:33 AM by Artfactial »

Offline Artfactial

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Council Reports of 1696-1697
« Reply #68 on: September 06, 2020, 06:30:57 AM »
Intermediate Council meeting December 18th AD 1696
The ruling Council and assembly of the Burgesse gathers at the Town Hall for a vote on the new representatives as many have fallen to the starvation that still wrecks us.
The Council notes the death of our 12th governor, Governor Clarech Germain, on November 11th by the starvings. Of special note is also the loss of Humbert Haynes on October 19th ’94 followed by his eldest son, our 11th governor Haywardo Haynes, a year later. Many of Haynestown’s founders have in recent years been taken away from us to settle a new paradise on God’s side in Heaven.
The Ruling Council, with many of the Burgesses in attendance by Assembly, hereby appoints new council members:
Mister Errold Germain, who now resides over the Haynes estate.
Mister Landy Haynes, now being the most senior member of the family name.
Mister Orio Glowbrenn, now residing in the Mersey estate.
Monsieur Audio Le Veelu, respected member of the Burgesses and owner of the Le Veelu Mining corporation.
Mister Sincer Applegate, who owns considerable amount of plantations.

The Council names Aryant Glowbrenn as 13th Governor of Haynestown. Some of the gathered public voiced concerns with the number calling it an ill omen.

Singed and decreed,
Governor Aryant Glowbrenn & ruling council members Landy Haynes, Darney Mersey, Dandreas Chaarason, Errold Germain, Orio Glowbrenn, Jalentin Barents and Cleonidad LeFevre, Sincer Applegate


Intermediate Council meeting April 25th AD 1697
The ruling Council has lost yet again two of its members being Gorvernor Aryant Glowbrenn and Reverent Darney Mersey. The Ruling council hereby votes Errold Germain to be the 14th gorvernor of Haynestown. Errold, now steeled with new faith and resolve after the death of Krissa, vows to once again bring the colony on the path to righteousness and prosperity. May God have mercy on us!
As Gorvernor Errold can no longer fulfill the duties of the Clerk of the Writ, the function has been appointed on to Emmie Barents who will keep the council informed of all birth and death notes in town.

Governor Errold Germain & ruling council members Landy Haynes, Darney Mersey, Dandreas Chaarason,  Orio Glowbrenn, Jalentin Barents and Cleonidad LeFevre, Sincer Applegate

October 12 AD 1697, the 3-Gorvernor Year.
The council opens the meeting by acknowledging the death of 27 persons. Among them being Errold Germain, 14th Governor of Haynestown, may he find peace with our Lord. The Council also notes 17 newborn.
The Council, in accordance with the gathered Burgesse, names Landy Haynes as the 15th Governor of Haynestown.
With the passing of two councilmen, the council welcomes the new patriarchs of their family, Chaun Germain and Talonso Mersey into its mids as new Ruling Council members.

Of Construction
In December of last year the Vice-Admirality tower by the Baygate was completed. While no official
In January Governor Germain ordered the Lashade mines to be fully closed down to free up laborers for the fields.
That same month, most of the brickworkers were called upon to aid in food gathering and the preparation of new fields.
This included a second carrot field is to be plowed by the third carrotstreet.
Governor Germain and Reverent Darney Mersey ordained a stricter work ethic to be embraced with less demands on quality, enforcing quotas by militia presence at the forges, which has increased our tool production by a margin.
Herli Mersey and Ernestin Hill oversaw the deconstruction of the old mill which was finished in early September.

Of the Burgesse
Hayde and Clellary Mersey and son Cornelio, having converted to Cathelosism last year, now are custodians of the Saint Agnes Orphanage.
While this sort of inbreeding is frowned upon in general, the children late Reverent Darney of the Mersey family have increasingly grown insular in their bonds.
The winter was especially harsh with frost creeping deep into April and many succumbing to the hunger and malnourishment during the cold long months.
Norinnea Haynes, apprentice hunter to Master Lamon Hanfort, moved in with Remiah DeHaart, after the death of Winnifreda, to take care of him on his old age in-between hunting trips.
Giancarly Bowen moved in with Loycelyne Haynes to help her managing the Haynes’ Estate.
April 6th Humbert II was betrothed to Lizbeth, and they started living in a newly-build cottage by New Pastures. She being his second cousin was considered far enough removed from one another to be accepted.

May 14th Amala Haynes married and moved in with Errold Germain as the new Governor’s wife.
After their deaths, Sincer and Earnet with their Kentony Applegate moved in as custodians of the Haynes Estate; an act which caused Governor Landy Haynes to protest the fact of a Glowbrenn member (Earnet) to reside over Haynes property. The case has been presented to Magistrate Kurtiss Mersey, who, stating frail constitution has guaranteed to look into it some other time. A statement which in turn enlivened the public debate for the election of a new Magistrate.
While uncommon in our colony, the case was taken up by our Country Court, led by Reverent Darney Mersey, to settle for the time being. Their judgement, being that the Applegates are allowed to remain custodians of the Haynes estate house while still being managed and owned by Governor Landy Haynes and the Haynes family, until such time as said family will once again occupy the estate grounds.

On July 7th, 27 Regufees from the Newfoundland colonies were reject. Later that month, Sorentino Pike, Sheilanie Davison and Loreann Currant, freeman from the Massachusetts Bay Colony, were admitted on the account of being such a small group.
By this same time the new cropfield was ready to be plowed and sown with Rye for next year.

Early October, baker's wife Dolli Ely, son Xanders and daughters Scarli and Earldine Brand were evicted from their home on the Main Street when Xanders announced his betrothal to Catholic Nancince Haynes, Master Rodolf Brand would not have this and disowned him. Since then Dolli and Earldine have moved back into the house.
Xanders and Nancine and young Scarli were admitted to the Saint Damasus hostel.
These sort of conflicts are increasingly common as the Catholic parish in our community grows and clashes with the more Puritan side of our Protestants. Both the Saint Damasus hostel and the Orphanage have been targeted by the zealous practitioners of the Three Pines Parish

As our militia is small and very much occupied, Lakenneth Germain has been appointed custodian of the fort, to keep it from falling apart.
As trade becomes more difficult in part due to troubles with the new enforced act in New London and in part due to the piracy plaguing our southern waters. England has saw fit to, under Royal patronige, send a bold Privateer to these shores with the sole purpose of hunting these vipers.
This Captain Kidd arrived in New York last year with much addo and many desperate and brave flocked to his crew.
News has reached us now that this Kidd has himself turned pirate and joined the ranks in what is known as the Pirate Round. A sing of our times that corruption and rot creeps in all veins.

Trade:
December last year: 25 more stone. For fertilizer.
Traded 345 grapes in April
august: traded 523 whale meat and a 1000 dried beef for 50 lumber, 10 glass, 38 pearls, 60 fertilizer and 50 tea.
Accounting:
The council takes note of 27 deaths, mostly from stariving, and 14 newborn in this year.
The total population of the combined congregations being a 369 on this date.
Carrots: 808
Squash:665
Mellons: 763
Strawberries: 360
Pears:290
Rye:1960
Pumpkins:1400

Singed and decreed,
Governor Landy Haynes & ruling council members, Talonso Mersey, Dandreas Chaarason, Orio Glowbrenn, Chaun Germain, Jalentin Barents and Cleonidad LeFevre

« Last Edit: September 06, 2020, 10:19:03 AM by Artfactial »

Offline Artfactial

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1696 Map
« Reply #69 on: September 06, 2020, 10:17:56 AM »
So I was planning to have the town roughly mapped out in it's 1696 state as a nice timeframe. But it's taking energy I don't have and time I'd rather spend on planning for the furutre and working through the notes to catch up and finally, slowly, start playing again.
So, until that time, here's a rough sketch of the town layout of that year. I hope to do the future ones by hand, or at least polish them up more.

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Council meeting of November 2nd 1698 AD
« Reply #70 on: September 25, 2020, 05:23:23 AM »
Council meeting of November 2nd 1698 AD
Last November 12th, Loycelyne Haynes, keeper of the Haynes estate and late scribe of the Writ, age 53, succumbed to the hunger. The Council honors the passing of another pillar of our community.
The Ruling Council welcomes Audio Le Veelu as new Councilmember, under vow that he represents his family, laborers and company but not his faith. The Council notes objections from the gathered burgesse, mainly from the Haynes family, to this act.

On the Burgesse:
Last December after founding out their relationship, Loraina Haynes petitioned for divorces of Audio Le Veelu on account of his fornication.
Solonel Mersey married Harlsie Roos in February.
13th of April Audio Le Veelu marries Loreann Currant, the freewoman from the Massechusets Bay; a considerable rise in class.
4th of May Heribert Winter and Loraina Haynes married and moved into the new hunters cabin along the river.
Nico DeHaart and Genifred Chaarason married in spring living and moved into the town hostel.
As the town searches for a new Magistrate, the Haynes family had the honor of hosting Magistrate Samuel Wyllys, Magistrate of Hartfort, and holder of much of the Haynes’ wealth in New England. Magistrate Wyllys met with the ruling council and would help in the search for a replacement of Magistrate Kurtis Mersey.
Furthermore, after a showing through the town, he proclaimed to be thoroughly impressed with the colony and would see it prosper more and help our food troubles. With this, plans were made to set out a commission to designing the future of our town. We would have our city on a hill, a paradise, much like the modern grid plans applied in Hartfort and Philadelphia. To this, the ruling council commits.

Meanwhile in Hartfort, the honorable Major-General Flitz-John Winthrop, of King William’s war fame and of that most venerable family, has been elected as the new Governor of the Colony of Connecticut, an occasion for which the ruling council traveled there on the return trip with Master Wyllys. 
This spring the times of abject hunger seem to have been behind us. Yet we suffer still a on labor; the wounds left by our decline in citizens can be felt in every house.

On Agriculture and Construction:
In spite of our doubled efforts to produce more crops, the harvests were very scarce last year.
This year, a very early frost in October damaged the crops, mostly the strawberries and pumpkins by the new pastures, with most of the harvest failing there.

The council hereby decrees a transplanting of the burger woods to be effective. In march, a new foresting lodge had been completed outside the city wall bounds. The old lodge will continue to cut trees, but not plant them as to free up space for crop fields. This starts the process of dismantling of the Burgerwoods at its current location to make room for the new grin plans.
Furthermore, the Princes Pines Logging Company has been issued a permit for a riverside logging barge dock and a hardwood lodge planned to facilitate the direct sale of timber and logs, with the usual percentage of the sale to be taxed by the city.
In June the Oak garden of the Latin School caught a blight and had to be cut down. It was decided to be replanted with pear trees instead.
In August, the sheep flock on the Chaarason estate by Second street developed a pox and had to be slaughtered. Further use of these grounds for plantation or pastures has been forbidden.
Two new pastures are being cleared by the New Pastures town at the time of this meeting.
While a consecrated area has been cleared for the new burying grounds expansion, there is insufficient stone available to provide it with a proper walling.

On the War:
As of Autumn of last year, the fighting between the English and the French has officially been halted and a peace was signed in Ryswick. The Status Quo was agreed upon and the conquered lands on the French are now part of the new border. The Iroquois Indians, however, were not included in these dealings and have not laid down their arms.

Trade:
60 bales of fine wool and 300 fine down for 600 dried plums, 770 dried fish for 50 lumber and 27 pears and 50 fertilizer.

Accounting:
The council takes note of 14 newborn in this year.
Sacks of Rye-3373
Mellons—84
Pears-308
Squash-599
Carrots-500
Pumpkins-451
Strawberries-276
Cherries-399

Singed and decreed,
Governor Landy Haynes & ruling council members, Talonso Mersey, Dandreas Chaarason, Orio Glowbrenn, Chaun Germain, Jalentin Barents, Cleonidad LeFevre and Audio Le Velu

« Last Edit: September 25, 2020, 05:58:53 AM by Artfactial »

Offline Nilla

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Re: Artfactial- Connecticut Coastal Colony- Haynestown and it's genealogy
« Reply #71 on: September 26, 2020, 06:18:02 AM »
So, you are back on track again. Wish you luck, it looks like you will need some with that small food surplus.

Just one question; how did you managed to get a devorced person remarry?

Offline Artfactial

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Re: Artfactial- Connecticut Coastal Colony- Haynestown and it's genealogy
« Reply #72 on: September 27, 2020, 02:53:40 AM »
Hey @Nilla , thanks!:) Yeah, one more year to go and I'm all caught up so I can actually start fixing the problems instead of writing about them. Going to be good to be finally back into the game.

Well, the divorces happen from time to time, in game usually with job changes (which are often in famine times). It's not always that new spouses move in with single parents, but makes for good story telling when they do.
A while back I had a German family break up, the husband moved out with two kinds while the mother was left with one. The husband soon got a new wife, but the ex-wife never did. So, it's just a matter of keeping track and making notes and making the story around it as you go, I try not to mess with it too much.
I should be harsher on these cousin marriages but have my hands full as it is.

Anyway, I'll be doing another genealogy/history update at 1700 and than I'll be all set to get back.:)

Offline Nilla

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Re: Artfactial- Connecticut Coastal Colony- Haynestown and it's genealogy
« Reply #73 on: September 27, 2020, 03:47:13 AM »
Are you really sure that there was a new wife by the divorced man as long as the ex wife was still alive? I have never seen that and I have had many divorces (willingly and unwillingly). It's a game mechanic that happens when you have more houses than families. But the couples are never really divorced, the woman still gets children. And if you throw one of the divorced people out of their house he/she will always move back to the ex; it looks like they never really are divorced, just living in separate houses. But there might be exceptions, Banished never stops to surprise. And of course; you always have the freedom of the author of your story to stretch the gameplay facts, just for fun and to get a good story. I did so in my Iceland story as you might remember as I invented an English merchant to brighten the last year of one of my main characters or transformed an ordinary old age death to "was killed by envious neighbors" for another.😉

Offline Artfactial

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Re: Artfactial- Connecticut Coastal Colony- Haynestown and it's genealogy
« Reply #74 on: September 28, 2020, 02:07:21 AM »
Alright, I checked with my other divorces and looks like you're right. Most didn't re-marry, though some went to live with others (which I often narrate as some other kind of relationship). On one occasion I accentually married a daughter to a father when I misspelled her name.:| Oops.

This last one might have been a rarer situation...or a mistake on my part as there are 2 Audio's alive and things might have gotten jumbled.:\