Author Topic: A Storybook Tale: Dunderwoodruff  (Read 8038 times)

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Offline slink

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Re: A Storybook Tale: Dunderwoodruff
« Reply #30 on: August 09, 2014, 10:32:51 AM »
awesome story :) you should start writing books and scripts to make movies :)
but all along it reminds me that in Nov2014 : Civilizations: Beyond Earth will be released and launched :)

Good job, i liked it :)

Thanks!   :)

Civilizations: Beyond Earth sounds a bit like Alpha Centauri, which was also a sequel to Civilization.  *frowns*  It even has worms that periodically emerge and attack your cities, just like in Alpha Centauri.  Well, I enjoyed Alpha Centauri.  Maybe I can enjoy this new game, even if it is Alpha Centauri in sheep's clothing.  *grin*

Offline solarscreen

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Re: A Storybook Tale: Dunderwoodruff
« Reply #31 on: August 09, 2014, 11:54:59 AM »
awesome story :) you should start writing books and scripts to make movies :)
but all along it reminds me that in Nov2014 : Civilizations: Beyond Earth will be released and launched :)

Good job, i liked it :)

Thanks!   :)

Civilizations: Beyond Earth sounds a bit like Alpha Centauri, which was also a sequel to Civilization.  *frowns*  It even has worms that periodically emerge and attack your cities, just like in Alpha Centauri.  Well, I enjoyed Alpha Centauri.  Maybe I can enjoy this new game, even if it is Alpha Centauri in sheep's clothing.  *grin*

I'm actually waiting on Beyond Earth myself.  Sounds like fun!  Have a look at this article from E3:
http://www.gameinformer.com/b/news/archive/2014/06/14/civilization-beyond-earth-looks-out-of-this-world.aspx

Edit:
Available for download on October 24th.  Pre-orders get 6 more maps...

« Last Edit: August 09, 2014, 11:57:58 AM by solarscreen »
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Offline slink

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Re: A Storybook Tale: Dunderwoodruff
« Reply #32 on: August 09, 2014, 01:01:14 PM »
I want the overpowered corgi.   ;D

Offline rkelly17

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Re: A Storybook Tale: Dunderwoodruff
« Reply #33 on: August 12, 2014, 08:32:15 AM »
. . . .

I would prefer Pilsner Urquil (sp?) but I can't find it here so I am trying out various of the available, more bitter, brews.  I can't remember, is Guinness stout bitter?

. . . .

The story isn't quite over yet.  *wicked grin*

Wow! An even better ending.

And, yes, Guinness is bitter, but it is a different bitter than Pilsner Urquell. Since Pilsner Urquell is the prototype for German "Pils," if you can find other German imports in that style you'll get the same effect, though there can only one Urquell (which means something like "original source"-- @Paeng can correct my German).

Offline slink

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Re: A Storybook Tale: Dunderwoodruff
« Reply #34 on: August 12, 2014, 11:35:53 AM »
. . . .

I would prefer Pilsner Urquil (sp?) but I can't find it here so I am trying out various of the available, more bitter, brews.  I can't remember, is Guinness stout bitter?

. . . .

The story isn't quite over yet.  *wicked grin*

Wow! An even better ending.

And, yes, Guinness is bitter, but it is a different bitter than Pilsner Urquell. Since Pilsner Urquell is the prototype for German "Pils," if you can find other German imports in that style you'll get the same effect, though there can only one Urquell (which means something like "original source"-- @Paeng can correct my German).

As I recall, stouts use Fuggles hops and pilsners use Tettnanger (sp? again).  At least, those were the hops that I used when we lived where the water was good enough to make my own beer.  I still have some of those hops, in the freezer.  But wait, no, I see from the Wikipedia that Pilsner Urquell uses Saaz hops, which I now recall also having bought.  I have some Hallertau hops also.  I was making "steam beer", which is lager yeast grown at ale temperatures, as well as pilsner and stout.  My homemade beer project ended in this house when I began getting entire cases with bacterial infections.  I tried drinking them anyway but got horrible headaches, so I was forced to dump them down the drain.  After that, I only drank commercially brewed beer.  I kept the hops pellets and the malt, however.  After fifteen years I had to throw out the canned malt syrups because the cans had swelled very badly.  The dry malt has survived, somewhat to my amazement with our periodic mouse infestations.  The dry malts are only being kept in 5-qt plastic ice cream buckets.  Rodents can chew through plastic.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2014, 11:50:25 AM by slink »

Offline rkelly17

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Re: A Storybook Tale: Dunderwoodruff
« Reply #35 on: August 12, 2014, 02:33:56 PM »
As I recall, stouts use Fuggles hops and pilsners use Tettnanger (sp? again).  At least, those were the hops that I used when we lived where the water was good enough to make my own beer.  I still have some of those hops, in the freezer.  But wait, no, I see from the Wikipedia that Pilsner Urquell uses Saaz hops, which I now recall also having bought.  I have some Hallertau hops also.  I was making "steam beer", which is lager yeast grown at ale temperatures, as well as pilsner and stout.  My homemade beer project ended in this house when I began getting entire cases with bacterial infections.  I tried drinking them anyway but got horrible headaches, so I was forced to dump them down the drain.  After that, I only drank commercially brewed beer.  I kept the hops pellets and the malt, however.  After fifteen years I had to throw out the canned malt syrups because the cans had swelled very badly.  The dry malt has survived, somewhat to my amazement with our periodic mouse infestations.  The dry malts are only being kept in 5-qt plastic ice cream buckets.  Rodents can chew through plastic.

Ah, a homebrewer. I should have known. As a native Californian I had to brew steam beer--Gold Rush and all that--and I did German Alt Bier. I used a combination of Hallertau, Tettnang and Saaz. Gave it up when the diabetes set in. I still have the glass car boys (5 gal.) that I got from my father-in-law. In Ontario we have great health care but the big brewers have a monopoly on "The Beer Store" which keeps beer prices high, so home brewing is very popular. Yes, you are right on the hops involved. The other difference, I think, is that the Czechs and Germans put some hops in at the end of the boil to get a fresher aroma.

Offline slink

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Re: A Storybook Tale: Dunderwoodruff
« Reply #36 on: August 12, 2014, 03:17:26 PM »
I was brewing in 5-gal plastic pails, which probably explains the bacterial infections better than the water although the water does contains a small amount of ammonia according to my tropical fish tests from years ago.  Until last summer we did not have any place that 5-gal pails could be washed properly except for the bathtub, which is not sterile by any means.  Even then, the water will not run directly into any container from the faucet because the faucet is too short for the tub.  Some day I hope to correct that.  We put in a new kitchen last summer and I made sure the sink is big enough for large vessels.  We have a well and a septic system, so bleach is not a good idea.

The bathtub was plumbed by a man who is about 6' 6" tall.  He put the water control about chest height for me, when I am standing.  I asked him why he put it so high up and he stood in the bathtub to demonstrate that it was as low as he could reach comfortably while showering.  I am 5' 5" tall.  Bathing never even occurred to him.  I have to get on my knees to control the water coming into the bath.  At least he did not do what my aunt's husband did in their shower.  My uncle put the water controls at eye height for himself! ::)

I can't locate my beer recipe binder, but as I recall I added a little honey to my knock-off of Pilsner Urquell.  That's decidedly non-European, but it was a good approximation in flavor.  The place where I used to buy beer by the case was also a sort of monopoly.  There was the state-run liquor stores, and then state-controlled private beer dealerships.  You could in fact only buy beer by the case, except with a meal.  The variety available was wide, though.  The Plisner Urquell bottles had some charming imperfections, which were a reminder to me of Czechoslovakia's Communist society.  I haven't had any of it since they were liberated, so I don't know if the bottles are still so interesting.