Author Topic: Mod - Traders Complete Fix  (Read 8143 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Bobbi

  • Champion
  • Architect
  • *****
  • Posts: 604
Re: Mod - Traders Complete Fix
« Reply #15 on: October 05, 2014, 11:21:09 AM »
@rkelly17 "Right. What I'm looking for is the mod that convinces the seed and livestock merchants that once you have all the livestock and seeds they can really stop bring that stuff. Sort of an "I have all the seeds and animals, so livestock and seeds merchants stop coming" mod. Also a "I have all the seeds, so general goods merchant, please bring me more stone and iron" mod.  ;D My guess, though is that such is deep in code beyond modding reach."
Exactly how I feel!

Offline rkelly17

  • Founder
  • Banished Expert
  • *****
  • Posts: 1560
  • Country: ca
Re: Mod - Traders Complete Fix
« Reply #16 on: October 05, 2014, 01:13:05 PM »
Ah, the infamous dBASE program:

.set bugs off
.do whatIwant
  ;D ;D

Wait a minute!  :o  What's so funny about the program doing exactly what I want? Isn't that what it's supposed to do?

 :'(

Offline slink

  • Founder
  • Banished Expert
  • *****
  • Posts: 1222
  • Country: us
Re: Mod - Traders Complete Fix
« Reply #17 on: October 05, 2014, 01:33:06 PM »
Ah, the infamous dBASE program:

.set bugs off
.do whatIwant
  ;D ;D

Wait a minute!  :o  What's so funny about the program doing exactly what I want? Isn't that what it's supposed to do?

 :'(

The funny part, to a programmer, is that it seems as if the users never want the same thing from one minute to the next let alone tomorrow.   ;)

Offline rkelly17

  • Founder
  • Banished Expert
  • *****
  • Posts: 1560
  • Country: ca
Re: Mod - Traders Complete Fix
« Reply #18 on: October 05, 2014, 01:41:36 PM »
The funny part, to a programmer, is that it seems as if the users never want the same thing from one minute to the next let alone tomorrow.   ;)

You would have loved a former colleague of mine. For a long time I was the de facto IT support in our department--because I was the only one to RTFM, not because I was especially knowledgeable. This was when we were just moving from mainframe terminals to PCs and he had just gotten his first mouse. He was in his office and screamed out my name. I went down and he yelled, "This (many, many expletives deleted) mouse doesn't work! It opens stuff I don't want to open!" I asked him to show me what he meant. He carefully positioned the mouse cursor over the program he wanted to open, then leaned back and slammed his hand down on the mouse. It didn't open the program he wanted.

Offline salamander

  • Founder
  • Architect
  • *****
  • Posts: 624
  • Country: us
Re: Mod - Traders Complete Fix
« Reply #19 on: October 05, 2014, 01:55:18 PM »
Lol!!

Not really a programming thing, but reminds me of a story my sister-in-law, V.,  told back in the 80's when she was a system analyst for DoD, and was the person that folks went to when there was a problem.  One person called her about a floppy disk (yes ... a floppy disk ... a 5 1/4" disk no less) that couldn't be read anymore.  V. goes to their desk and asks to see the disk, and the person reaches up to their filing cabinet and retrieves a disk that is held up there using a refrigerator magnet.

Another person called her about a program that wouldn't work anymore, and was told to send my sister-in-law to make a copy and send it to her.  The next day V. received a photocopy of a floppy disk in an inter-department mail envelope.

Never underestimate the ability of computer users to do something never before expected.   ;)
« Last Edit: October 05, 2014, 03:55:27 PM by salamander »

Offline irrelevant

  • Champion
  • Banished Expert
  • *****
  • Posts: 2748
  • Country: us
Re: Mod - Traders Complete Fix
« Reply #20 on: October 05, 2014, 03:53:00 PM »
My first position as Controller was in 1990 at the Saturday Evening Post. Our accounting package was something really clunky that used 8" floppys, you'd put in one to load the software, then it would prompt you to replace that floppy with the one that the data got stored on.

Offline slink

  • Founder
  • Banished Expert
  • *****
  • Posts: 1222
  • Country: us
Re: Mod - Traders Complete Fix
« Reply #21 on: October 05, 2014, 04:23:07 PM »
Was it running on a Wang computer?  In 1986 the DoD office I was programming for in my position of Materials Engineer, they had software running from 8" floppies that the secretaries used.  I had the only two IBM PCs in the office.  The rest were all Wang computers.  Another engineer was in charge of those.  I got a lot of mileage out of the name.  *snicker*
 

Offline irrelevant

  • Champion
  • Banished Expert
  • *****
  • Posts: 2748
  • Country: us
Re: Mod - Traders Complete Fix
« Reply #22 on: October 05, 2014, 04:27:23 PM »
Now you mention it, I think it was a Wang. It for sure wasn't IBM or Apple or TRS80.

The first computer I used was in 1981, a DEC10 at IUPUI. It was amazing. There were no CRTs, instead we used something called DEC-writers, which fed 14" greenbar up through it from a box on the floor. It would print out the dialog line by line.

Offline slink

  • Founder
  • Banished Expert
  • *****
  • Posts: 1222
  • Country: us
Re: Mod - Traders Complete Fix
« Reply #23 on: October 05, 2014, 04:54:34 PM »
Wang was an unfortunate name for a computer.  There was a lot of "he's off playing with his ..." and "his ... isn't working", and other such comments made about that other engineer.  He boasted that the repairman from Wang Computers was very prompt and polite, and I boasted that I never had to call a repairman for my IBM computers.  This was true, although I would have fixed them myself if there was a problem so a repairman was superfluous.

The first computer I ever heard of was the one my mother programmed to run payroll with when I was a small child.  She programmed it by flipping switches to select the correct hardwired program, before turning it on.  Later on, she learned to read punch tape and taught that to me.  Even later she became a keypunch operator.  I first programmed a computer when I was a Chemistry major in university.  It was an IBM 360 that were accessed by card decks, or if you had research money to burn, by teletype terminals.  I learned Fortran.  The business majors had a Honeywell mainframe of some kind and learned BASIC.  The research group I joined as an undergraduate researcher had access to a number of PDP-11s.  They ran their programs from big tape cartridges made by BASF.  I preferred the card decks, myself.  Our postdoc was forever complaining about how difficult it was to locate a particular position on the BASF tape.

In graduate school I was cut off from computer access, except for a programmable HP desktop calculator.  It frosted me no end that undergraduates were allowed to actually touch the computer, but graduate students were not even allowed to use it via card decks.  Eventually I got some time on a neighboring university's mainframe, via a faculty member who was sympathetic to frustrated would-be computer users where I was going to school.

As a postdoc I had access once again to a PDP-11 but did not have time to play, except for Star Trek which we took turns playing until the boss was sighted.  The PDP-11 was dedicated to some spectrometer and was not supposed to be used for anything else.

It was when I became a genuine adult member of society, working for an oil company as a research chemist, that I was re-united with computers.  We had infinite time on the IBM mainframe and numerous Hewlett Packard PCs attached to instruments, of which we bought a few new ones at the end of every year just before the budget was due to run out.  Sadly, the collapse of the chemical industry in the US brought that career to an end, but in the meantime I had built a Heathkit-Z80 and bought an Atari 800.  I haven't stopped buying computers since, although I don't buy the latest and greatest anymore.  There just isn't a lot of "greatest" lately, it seems to me.

My mother got a Commodore 64 about the same time as I got my Atari, and I bought her an IBM-clone PC when she retired.  The mainframes where she worked had long ago been scrapped and she was running IBM PCs for them.  She was still using her computer up until two years before she died in her late eighties.  For the last two years of her life she suffered mental degradation and my sister took away her computer.  I think that was a mistake, but since they both lived a six-hour drive from me there was nothing I could do about it.  My sister is a cell-phone addict who has no use for computers.  I am glad that I took after my mother, and amazed in retrospect that she was so technically inclined in her day-and-age and with little formal education (she had one year in the Army as a nursing student).